The Print Room Blog

Just how good are the processes in your shop? How do you go about implementing what you just learned? On today’s Success Stories podcast, Cory Beal, of Floodway Print Company talks about his early days as a BMX bike rider, along with how his desire to learn has helped him learn how to create his own merch, start his entrepreneurial journey, and implement new processes to help his business run smoother.

 

Marshall Atkinson hosts a podcast called ‘Success Stories’ for S&S and I had a great time sitting down and talking shop. We focussed a ton on Lean principles like the art of failure. Most improvements fail, and it’s through those failures that we learn so much!

 

Click the image above to find the podcast on your favourite service.

That’s right! Screen Printing Mag gave us access to their Instagram account for the day and we put out a HUGE tour.

Over 60min of footage from the shop including:

  • a full shop tour
  • tons of ‘smart shop’ automations
  • shop hacks!
  • Lean improvements

 

A tour this in-depth has never been done in our industry before, and definitely not at a shop like ours! So tune in and enjoy, there is a ton to see.

You can still view the tour in the highlight on Screen Print Mag’s Instagram account.

Today, we’re sharing a few answers from Cory’s quick interview with Jivasio. Cory is the founder of Floodway Print Company, based in the vibrant city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

As entrepreneurs, we often find ourselves yearning for guidance and wisdom from those who have walked the path before us. With each story shared, we gain valuable insights, learn from triumphs and setbacks, and find inspiration to fuel our own ventures.

From humble beginnings to becoming a key player in the printing landscape, Floodway’s story is one of passion, perseverance, and a deep connection with the community.

What’s your backstory and how did you come up with the idea?

It’s about helping our clients look great and achieve their goals. A lifelong BMX rider, Beal was introduced to the industry when he came to a screen-printing shop to get some t-shirts printed for a BMX event. He wasn’t totally sold on the process as a customer and realized he could do it better.

Today, clients include businesses, brands and bands of all kinds, and some of them are literally trying to cure cancer. Some are on their last bit of money trying to get some merchandise printed, so again, respecting those resources is integral to every step of the process. But whether you’re into BMX, curing cancer or installing pipes, it’s all the same thing to Floodway.

Founder Cory with Floodway’s first automatic press, and his son.

 

How do you motivate yourself to keep going every day?

It’s the ultimate reward to see the vision of your business come to life. The bonus for us is we often get to see our work out in the wild, too. So it’s both the business, and the craft.

What’s your one biggest accomplishment as a business owner?

It’s a continuous process but learning to hire and lead a team has been rewarding for myself, and the business.

 

Read the rest of the interview on Jivasio.

Super grateful for this opportunity to sit down with long-time print pal, Chessie from Squeegee & Ink. We shared some unpopular opinions about our industry, some Lean and productivity thoughts, and some banter about Northern England – of course.

Chessie chats with Cory about his approach to challenging the screen print community online, pubs in Yorkshire, England and of course we hear Cory’s unpopular opinion about the industry. Cory Beal is the owner of Floodway Print Company. Based in Winnipeg, Canada, Floodway is a print business built upon the principle that by starting with delivering the best customer experience and working out the process required to deliver that experience you will inevitably always be open to new ways of doing things.

FLOODWAY PRINT CO. | CORY | S02 E32

Cory linked up with Gavin on T-Shirt Business Podcast and talked about how Lean Manufacturing will change your Tshirt Business game. We covered a couple reasons you should embrace Lean Manufacturing.

 

Tshirt Business Podcast is all about connecting and serving business owners in the t-shirt business space.⁣⁣ Business owners, creators, and vendors that serve t-shirt businesses come here to learn and level up their life and business.

 

Past episodes include guests like: Ryan Moor – Founder / CEO of Ryonet and ROQ.US, Bruce Ackerman – Founder / CEO of Printavo, and Marshall Atkinson – Founder of Atkinson Consulting. So it’s an honour to join the platform!


Go listen to the full conversation by finding “T-shirt Business Podcast” on your favourite podcast platform. Search for “T-shirt Business Podcast” on Apple, Spotify, and YouTube to listen and subscribe.

Our little reclaim department was featured in this month’s Images Mag! Super stoked to share the ‘Screen Tracker’ tool I built using Google Forms & Sheets, Data Studio, and Zapier.

 

View the original spread in the online version of Images Mag UK.

 

“A label maker, a cheap barcode scanner and Google Forms – Cory
Beal shares his simple yet effective technique for monitoring screens
at Floodway Print Company”

If you’re anything like us here at Floodway, you want to work smarter, not harder.

In this video I’m going to show you a bunch of improvements I made to our darkroom in hope it gets you thinking about ways to streamline your own business.

Whether it’s a darkroom or a dentist office., there’s lots of ways to be more efficient, but it all boils down to seeing the different kinds of waste and making a continuous effort to improve it. Some waste like a misprint is pretty obvious, but the result of making every process safer, simpler and faster is that quality goes up, because mistakes and just overall effort goes down.

 

The busier things are, the more important it is to stop and Fix What Bugs You. Check out the video for some examples of improvements made in our shipping department recently.

Making improvements when you’re super busy is the most important time to stop and address issues because there’s a ton of work in front of you to benefit from it. We’ve been slammed and recently added fulfillment services to our roster, so in this video I’m going to show a couple small improvements in our Shipping Department that make the job easier and reduce a bunch of wastes in this little area.

I’ve got a free download for screen printers, it’s nine registration marks, ready to drop into your art or templates.

 

But that’s pretty simple on its own, so what I’m going to do in this video is use the pack to show the custom registration marks feature in Pre-Press Pro.

 

The download has nine different marks in vector format, so they’re perfect for automating with a script like Pre-Press Pro, and, that’s why I put this pack together anyway.

So this video is going to show how easy it can be to place these marks with Pre-Press Pro, but the download alone should still help anyone who needs or wants to try a different registration mark.

 

 

Registration Marks Pack – http://bit.ly/free-reg-marks-pack

 

Pre-Press Pro – http://bit.ly/PREPRESS-PRO

In this video we’re talking about screen printing the inside of a shirt for a really rad vintage look. And it’s pretty simple, so I just wanted to show the way we get it done here. You can also achieve a variation of this look with a texture applied to the design.

I want to start in the ink area for a specific reason, but I’ll get to that in a second. First, I just want to state the obvious here and say that I don’t know even close to all there is to know about screen printing, so this is not a tutorial. But I do know what’s working for us here so I wanted to share a bit of that and hope it helps someone so let me know if you have any questions down in the comments below. And for those who are already familiar with the process I would really appreciate any of your tips in the comments as well.

Okay, so first things first is ink. There are a quite a few PVC free options for screen printing inks on the market. PVC isn’t that scary yaknow, like if you drink water chances are it sat in a PVC at some point. But a ton of people do have skin sensitivities to it, so whenever a print is going direct on the skin, like these inside out prints, or care labels in the neck, we use a PVC free ink. I’m using this stuff from Excalibur, mostly because this isn’t a very demanding application for ink, it prints well, it’s available locally to me, and that’s pretty much it.

And this is important because I think it’s often overlooked. Some of you might be thinking you don’t “need” it because a customer hasn’t asked for it, or you haven’t had a complaint, but this is not something you want to be reactive about. PVC options are there, so I suggest being proactive instead of waiting for some poor customer of your customer to have a skin problem.

Other than that, the actual printing is pretty straightforward. The PVC free ink is already thinner than regular plastisol, so it goes nicely through a higher mesh count and does a good job coming through the other side of the shirt when a lot of pressure is applied.

So it’s pretty much just choosing a thinner material like these Bella+Canvas Triblend Tees, flipping the shirt inside out, quick roller for a smooth print surface, lots of pressure, sharp squeegee angle, slow print stroke, and then printing and curing like normal. Flip it back the right way and boom, the print looks rad. Your customers will think it’s amazing and really the only thing you’re charging extra for is some shirt flippin’. So it’s an economical choice for clients as far as special effects go.

So that’s it, that’s all, simple as that. Flip the shirt, use the right ink, lots of pressure, looking good. So I appreciate y’all watching and I hope this gets your gears turnin’. Thanks again.